Categories
For Parents

8 steps to hire the perfect nanny

You are about to hire a nanny and put the livelihood of your children into the hands of someone that you do not know, and for most parents, hiring a nanny is an overwhelming process. Ultimately, you want to find someone whom you can trust to provide the best care for your children while you are away. If you follow these steps during your nanny search, you can ensure your chances of hiring the perfect nanny for your family.

  1. Establish the needs of your family

    Make a list of requirements that are important to you. This can include personality traits, specialized skills, amount of experience, age and education and training. You will also want to take into consideration the scheduling requirements, salary and benefits that you are willing to pay, the responsibilities that the nanny will be expected to handle and what types of discipline the nanny will use.

  2. Create a job description.

    Just like a business would create job descriptions for their employees, you will want to type up a one-page job description that entails all of the nanny’s duties. This will not only be helpful to share with potential candidates and nanny agencies, it can also help you come up with interview questions and lay the foundation for the employment agreement.

  3. Advertise the position.

    If you are thinking about going through a reputable nanny agency, you will certainly reduce a lot of the legwork of performing the search for that perfect nanny. However, if you want to find a nanny on your own, you can type up a condensed version of your job description and advertise the position in the local newspaper, online and/or on flyers posted at nearby churches, fitness centres and local community centres. In this case, you may get swarmed with applicants and you will have to sift through the applications carefully and make sure that they are qualified before proceeding onto the next steps.

  4. Conduct initial screenings with phone interviews

    This step can be reduced tremendously if you choose to utilize a nanny agency – they will perform the initial screenings and send you only candidates who match your requirements. If you are performing the search on your own, you will want to discuss the criteria that you listed in Step #1 first. Of course, personality and chemistry are vital for a perfect fit and you will get a good feel for this over the phone. You will want to narrow your applicant pool down with the initial screenings over the phone.

  5. Start the face-to-face interviews

    Once you have narrowed the applicant pool down to several serious potential candidates, make arrangements for them to come to your home, one at a time. You may want to interview each candidate alone, without the children first, just in case the candidate is not the perfect one. If the interview goes well, there is a great chemistry between you and the candidate and your gut feeling is good, go ahead and invite the children into the room to see how the candidate interacts with them. Remember, your children will also have to like the nanny in order for her to suit your family perfectly.

  6. Hold working interviews/paid trial time

    This is an observation period that will allow you to watch potential candidates in action. Set up 3-5 days that are similar to a “regular” day for the nanny so that you can accurately assess their performance. During this time, you will be able to pick up on any problems or issues, such as lateness or inability to handle the tasks at hand…or it will strengthen your decision about who would be best for the job. If you are utilizing a nanny agency, they should provide you with a period of time within which they will send a replacement if the nanny is not working out, which is typically 90 days, so be sure to use your trial time wisely.

  7. Perform background and reference checks

    A good nanny agency will handle this step for you comprehensively. They have the know-how to obtain this information and may even provide monitoring services throughout the term of employment. If you are conducting the search on your own, contacting references and checking for any bruises in the candidate’s backgrounds can certainly provide you with enough information to make a final decision. (A background check is absolutely vital to provide you with the peace of mind that you want.) Be sure to ask previous employers about timeliness, attitude and behaviour, and if they think the candidate will be suitable for the duties on your job description – as well as handling the amount of children that you have.

  8. Present the job offer and employment agreement

    You’ve finally found your perfect nanny! Smart businesses present their employees with written employment agreements to promote clear expectations and minimize the potential of misunderstandings. This can also be a crucial step for you and your nanny. A good nanny agency will assist you with creating an employment agreement that works for you and the nanny, presenting the job offer and mediating during the negotiations. If you are hiring without a nanny agency, you will want to create an employment agreement that is extensive and all-inclusive. In addition, you will want to type up a job offer and be prepared for negotiations and to alter the job offer as necessary.

Once an agreement has been made, it’s time to enter into the relationship by signing the employment agreement and setting the start date for your new nanny. You should build on your relationship by setting up monthly evaluation meetings with your nanny. These meetings can be the perfect time to discuss any issues or problems that the nanny is encountering and come up with solutions as a team. In addition, this is a great time to provide her with both positive feedback and constructive criticism. In addition, you will want to set up a meeting that marks the yearly anniversary for your family and the nanny to discuss the possibility of a bonus or a raise. We hope that these steps help you find that perfect nanny for your family. If you find that you do not have the time that is required to do the footwork of searching for that perfect match, we are here to provide you with our expertise and experience! Feel free to contact us any time.

Categories
For Parents

What should I pay my nanny?

At Nannies on Call, we find that that the average hourly rate that nannies seek is sitting between $25 – 40+ (Across Canada), with the average being about $30 gross per hour.  At $30/hour and 40 hours per week, this equates to about $63,000 annually. This is a fair wage considering the forever rising cost of living, and the professionalism shown by these nannies.  If these figures are not in your budget, there are a few options to reduce your costs.  Nanny shares, allowing a nanny to bring his/her own child to work with them, or hiring a nanny who is less experienced are just a few examples.  The old adage of ‘You get what you pay for’ is very true!

A few other things to consider:
1) How many children do you have? Their ages? Multiple children in a household will warrant a higher wage.

2) Are you looking for full time or part time hours? How many hours/days per week do you need the nanny? Typically a Nanny will be seeking a higher wage for part time hours. 

3) Will the nanny be required to live in or out? What and where are the accommodations if live-in? Live in is more cost effective but you will have someone living in your home.

4) Will you require any overtime? Depending on what province you are in, there may be overtime after a certain number of hours per week. For example, in BC, anything over 8 hrs a day or 40hrs per week, the employee is paid time and a half. Anything past 12hrs a day is double time.

5) What types of benefits do you plan to offer? (i.e. Health insurance, holidays, sick days, cell phone, car?) Many of these are tax deductible for the employer.

6) Do you need a nanny who drives? Would the nanny need their own car or do you plan to provide one? Driving nannies are paid more. If they are using their own vehicle to drive your children, they will be required to track their kms (for work purposes) and reimbursed the current government standard (currently $0.61 km).

7) Do you expect the nanny to perform any non-child related duties, such as housekeeping or errands? A nanny that can offer both child focused care as well as additional housekeeping or cooking should be paid a higher wage. Often House Managers are offered the top end of the pay-scale in any given city.

8) Do you require the nanny to have an education degree? Early childhood degree? Nursing degree? Teaching degree? Expect to pay top dollar for someone with an education background as well as nanny experience.

9) Will you need your nanny to travel with you? This should be discussed ahead of time. Plan to pay your nanny’s travel expenses including their regular wage. If they are working more, overtime rates would be included. Depending on if the nanny has their own room, you should consider a per diem as well.

10)  Do you want someone who speaks another language?

11) Taxes – There are things involved other than just paying someone’s salary. You are required be paying someone as an employee as per the CRA which means remitting taxes on their behalf as well as paying an employer portion. Depending on what province you live in, this will range from anywhere from 7 – 12% over and above your nanny’s gross wage. This would also include having appropriate in home insurance with Worker’s Compensation.

Extra Tips: If a nanny is looking for a higher wage than you are willing or able to pay, consider offering a competitive package that includes more vacation (the standard is 2 weeks paid per year as well as any other time not needed), metro/transit passes, medical benefits and attentional paid sick time. Do you want your nanny to be paid biweekly, bimonthly or even monthly? Make sure you know the rules for your province before making that decision. Carefully look into what the overtime rules are as well. Pay your nanny what they are worth.  If they feel that they are underpaid, they will be looking for another job in no time. Bottom line is that you should carefully consider what you can afford before hiring a nanny, so that you are not stuck making changes after someone has started.

Categories
For Nannies

Nannies and Divorce: Three Helpful Tips

Divorce is a reality that affects many families nowadays.

As a Nanny, you’ll likely encounter families and children who are facing the challenges and pressures that result from the impact of divorce and their unique circumstances.

For example, you might be employed by a family that’s currently working through a divorce or by a family that has already been a single-parent family for many years. Both families have been affected by divorce, but they will each present their own set of challenges.

Different families. Different divorce scenarios.

You may find a family where the parents work well together and you’ll work seamlessly with both parents, even though they have been separated for many years. The parents want the best for their children, which, to them, means hiring one person to care for their children.

You may, however, find another family where the parents don’t get along and are in the middle of a very nasty divorce. You were hired before they decided to separate and they both might want to continue to use your services, but it might put you in an uncomfortable situation, right in the middle of their nasty divorce.

What is your role as a Nanny? How do you support divorced parents and their children?

In spite of the possibly volatile and emotional situation at hand, it’s important that you keep in mind your first, and foremost, responsibility: to be a constant source of support and comfort in the children’s lives.

As a Nanny, you’ll also need to stay impartial and professional in your interactions with the parents (your employers).

Here are 3 helpful tips to help you handle this tricky scenario, while keeping things as constant and stable as you can for the children in your care:

1)     Establish a clear Employment Agreement –  If the divorce occurred prior to your start of work, but you realize that there are issues that need to be addressed, make sure that the issues are included in the Employment Agreement. If, on the other hand, the divorce occurs in the middle of your employment with the family, you may want to discuss which parent is the actual employer and how their expectations of you will change. You need to know if it’s okay to contact the other parent in an emergency situation and if there’s a problem with you working for both parents. Your nanny agency can help you with these negotiations if you’re uncomfortable talking to the parents about them.

2)     Maintain consistency –  You might be the only constant thing in the life of the children right now, so it’s up to you to keep a consistent schedule for them and continue to set clear expectations for them. While they’re going through this time of turmoil and confusion, you may find that the children will resort to testing limits and acting out, even if it’s been a while since the divorce has been finalized.

Nevertheless, what they need is the clear expectations and boundaries you set for for them. They need as much consistency as possible and you’ll be doing them a big favor by standing your ground and being unswerving. Keep your time with them as stable, normal and secure as you can.

3)     Compassion – You can help the children by providing a listening ear without passing judgment or taking sides. A little bit of compassion can go a long way with children; you can provide a safe place where they can talk about their feelings – something that they may not have anywhere else at this point in time. Let them know that they can come to you to talk anytime they want and you will not judge them or tell anyone else how they feel.

Divorce definitely presents many complicated situations and causes a plethora of emotions for the parents and the children. As the nanny, you can make a difference by being a neutral part of the equation, supporting the children with compassion, love and understanding while they work through the confusion that they’re facing.

Of course, if you encounter any of these situations and want some advice, we are here to help and you support you.

 

Categories
Job Opportunities

Administrative Assistant Needed

 

Nannies on Call/The Nanny Solution has an opening for a friendly administrative assistant with strong organizational skills and attention to detail. This a remote work, administrative position with opportunity for both mentorship and growth.

Who We Are:

We are Nannies on Call/The Nanny Solution, a Canadian nanny agency with over 20 years in the industry. We cater to busy families who require professional, child-loving, education-driven, and reliable nannies.⁠

We help place extraordinary nannies in temporary and permanent, live-out childcare positions with wonderful families in Vancouver, Calgary, Toronto and Ottawa. We exceed families’ expectations while helping nannies find the perfect family to work with.⁠

Who You Are:

  • You have at least 1 year of prior professional experience doing administrative work and are naturally comfortable with organization, multi-tasking, and solving problems calmly and creatively. Your friends and family describe you as Type A.
  • You are tech savvy and able to keep up with the latest softwares and schedulers that help make our lives easier.
  • You have a way with the written word and have excellent copywriting skills.
  • You have an impeccable phone manner, naturally at ease speaking on the phone and able to connect with clients.
  • You have a creative, outgoing, positive, “can do” nature (we are a casual office with a professional image)
  • You have a concierge type attitude towards service (client & detailed oriented).
  • You have a quiet, dedicated work space that looks professional.
  • You have a home office with lightning fast internet speed.
  • You are not looking for a rigid 9-5 schedule. This is a Monday-Sunday kind of industry, so we’re looking for someone who is flexible and who doesn’t mind sending an occasional email and monitoring their inbox over the weekend.

Your job duties will include:

  • Assistance with creating job descriptions and job qualifications.
  • Assistance with screening nanny candidates’ resumes and job applications.
  • Attend virtual meetings
  • Reference verification
  • Setting up interviews
  • Respond to client and nanny requests by phone and email, providing relatable, efficient service
  • Resolve problems at first point of contact, able to diffuse minor conflicts without escalating to management
  • Uploading documents
  • Supporting all departments in a variety of roles


Job Details:
This is a full time position, Monday to Friday, 8am-4pm PST and the salary is negotiable based on experience. This is a virtual position and you can live anywhere in Canada.

How to Apply:
In a world where you can send an email in a blink of an eye, we are looking for someone who stands out in the sea of applicants. Show us you care as much as we do.

Please send the following items to Michelle Kelsey, michelle@nanniesoncall.com as part of your application:

  • Cover letter and resume detailing relevant experience
  • Extra: A short video, no more than 3 minutes long, to introduce yourself, share why you think you would be a good fit for the position. BONUS: Mention something you learned about us from our websites.

Thank you to all who apply, however only successful applicants will be contacted for an interview.

Categories
COVID For Parents

The Rising Demand for Nannies During the Pandemic

When the COVID-19 pandemic hit in early 2020, parents had to scramble to find childcare as daycares, preschools, and elementary schools closed their doors. As a result, the demand for Full Time Nannies increased drastically. At the same time, families with existing Nannies extended their contracts in order to secure long term childcare, which in turn, slowed down the usual Nanny turnover rate, making available Nannies even more scarce. These factors are how the Nanny labour shortage began, so what’s been keeping it going over a year and a half later? Where are all the Nannies and what does the labour shortage mean for your family?

There are a number of reasons why families are still struggling to find a Nanny to care for their little ones. A few that we’ve encountered here at The Nanny Solution are: 

  • Many families acted quickly and either hired a Nanny at the onset of the pandemic or retained their existing Nanny. This took many professional childcare providers off the market early on.
  • Some former Nannies have made the decision to transition out of working in childcare during the pandemic, out of concern for both their own health and safety and their loved ones’. 
  • There are currently fewer Nannies available to work, as many of the Nannies in Canada are/were only here on two-year work visas. 
  • The majority of families only want to hire a Nanny that has been fully vaccinated, and unfortunately, not all Nannies are vaccinated. 

The demand for qualified, professional, fully-vaccinated Nannies is exceptionally high, while the supply is lower than ever. So, what does that mean for your Nanny search?

  • Expect to pay a higher wage. Nanny wages have soared as a result of the pandemic labour shortage, and we are seeing rates of $25 to $40 per hour across Canada.
  • Nannies may require medical benefits and/or additional paid sick days in their contracts. You can also expect to see a COVID-19 clause in the contract.
  • Nannies’ roles have changed over the past couple of years, as parents have transitioned to working from home and many children are attending school from home as well. These changes require increased communication, flexibility, and boundaries, as well as appropriate compensation. 

All that being said, if you’re just beginning your Nanny search, or if you’re coming to the end of your contract and trying to decide whether to hire a new Nanny or not, don’t get discouraged! There are still wonderful Nannies out there who are looking for work. It may take a little extra patience to find the right one for your family, but the peace of mind that comes with having safe, reliable, professional childcare is well worth it! 

Start your search today!

Categories
For Nannies For Parents

Establishing Healthy Boundaries

We believe that nurturing the nanny-family relationship is key in creating a harmonious environment for nannies, parents, and kids, and helps nannies want to stay with their work families for the long haul.

Here are 3 actionable steps to set up healthy boundaries in the nanny-family relationship.⁠

Know Your Responsibilities

Nannies: as an employee, parents are counting on you to be punctual and to perform your nanny duties diligently with care and enthusiasm.

Parents: As employers, nannies are counting on you to respect and honour their work hours, timely payment of their salary, and duration of the work contract.

When both parties respect and honour their obligations, they both have peace of mind and trust.

Prioritize Communication

Nannies: Speak with your employers about any work-related questions or concerns you may have sooner rather than later. Be assertive and proactive.

Parents: Nannies are amazing, but they are not mind readers. If you like things done a certain way then you have to show your nanny, train them, and give them regular feedback and praise.

Remember: Lack of communication is the #1 cause of relationship breakdowns!

Be Realistic

Nannies: Be proactive in completing your work tasks and offer flexibility (additional time or tasks) to your employers when you can. But remember that your free time outside of work is valuable, necessary, and important too.

Parents: Give your nanny a reasonable list of daily tasks; be respectful and realistic when asking for additional responsibilities or additional work hours. Remember that your nanny has a life outside of work and needs downtime too.

In establishing and maintaining healthy boundaries, both nanny and family feel appreciated and respected.

To learn more about how we can help you find a wonderful nanny that is a perfect match for your family, start here.

To join our pool of extraordinary, professional nannies, see our requirements.

Categories
For Nannies For Parents Newborn Care Specialist

Nursery Must-Haves

Creating an environment that is calm, comfortable, and conducive to sleep is essential when you’re setting up your baby’s nursery. We’ve put together a list of nursery must-haves — according to the baby experts, Newborn Care Specialists — to help you create the optimal sleep environment for your little one!

Changing table or changing pad
Whether you have a dedicated changing table or you set up a changing pad on top of a dresser, we definitely recommend using one with a cover. A cover makes cleaning up after any particularly messy diaper changes easy — just pull it off and throw it in the washing machine.

Diapers, wipes, cream, and disposal system
Keep these items close by the changing station for easy access. You may want to invest in a diaper genie for disposing diapers in, or simply use a lined garbage bin with a lid.

Crib (or bassinet, followed by crib)
You can decide to have your newborn sleep in a crib right away, or you can start with a bassinet and then transition them to a crib as they grow.

Firm mattress with waterproof mattress pad and tight-fitting sheets
Whether you’re using a bassinet or a crib, we recommend using a firm mattress and tight-fitting sheets, in order to reduce the risk of the sheets coming off and entangling or suffocating your infant. We also highly recommend putting a waterproof mattress pad underneath the sheets for easy clean-up following accidents.

Swaddle or sleep sack
Rather than using a blanket for warmth, newborns and infants should be placed in a swaddle or sleep sack at bedtime. Loose items, like blankets, increase the risk of entrapment or suffocation and should not be used in the bassinet or crib.

Pacifiers
Babies have a natural need to suck using a pacifier helps meet that need, while also soothing them. In addition, the use of pacifiers is recommended, as they help reduce the risk of SIDS (sudden infant death syndrome).

Blackout curtains
Blackout or room darkening curtains aren’t essential, but they do minimize the amount of natural light in the room, which may help your baby sleep a little bit longer.

Sound machine
Sound machines help muffle outside noises, soothe the baby, help them complete sleep cycles, and can create a calm, peaceful sleep environment. They’re not essential, but they are highly recommended.

Soft night light
Having a soft night light in the nursery is more for the parents’ and/or the Newborn Care Specialist’s benefit. It can help you move around and navigate the room while the baby is sleeping, without disturbing their sleep cycle by turning on a bright light.

Baby monitor
These days, there are more options out there than the walkie-talkie style sound monitors we grew up with. You can now purchase movement monitors, some of which you can even connect with your phone, which alert you when your baby does not move/breathe for a period of time. Video monitors are also available, so you can check on your baby without entering the nursery and disturbing their sleep.

Comfortable chair or glider
You are going to spend a lot of time feeding your baby and rocking them to sleep, so you want to make sure you have a comfortable place to sit while you do so. A good, comfortable chair or glider is a worthwhile investment, in our opinion.

Nursing pillow
Nursing pillows help prop the baby up during bottle feeds and/or while you are breastfeeding/chestfeeding them. These pillows can save your arms from getting tired and give you more mobility.

Side table
We recommend putting a small side table or nightstand next to the nursing station. This is where you can keep small items, such as water and snack for yourself, your phone, and, of course, burping cloths for easy access.

Burping cloths
You’ll always want to have plenty of burping cloths on hand for after feeding. Spit happens!

Small clock and baby tracker
Having a clock nearby — either a digital clock with a dim light or a quiet manual clock — can help you keep track of the baby’s feeding and sleeping schedule and patterns. A baby tracker is a useful place to record these patterns, and to ensure your baby is getting adequate sleep and feeding regularly.

Laundry hamper
Finally, we recommend having a laundry hamper in the nursery. It’s easier to just toss any soiled sheets, clothes, cloth diapers, burping cloths, etc. in a hamper, rather than having to carry them out to another room.

Categories
For Parents

3 Things You Need Before Hiring a Nanny

 

Choosing to hire a nanny in Canada is one of the most important decisions families make.⁠ 

Whether you choose to do your own nanny search or work with a nanny agency, there are 3 things you must do and know before you start this process.⁠

In our experience, ignoring these 3 things typically results in a lot of wasted time and frustration for both parents and nanny candidates.⁠

  • Know Exactly What You Need

Hiring a nanny means hiring someone who has a specific set of skills and experience.

As a parent, you need to be clear on which skills & experience you need your potential nanny to have, focusing and prioritizing your “must-haves” over your “nice-to-haves”, before you begin your nanny search.

When you know exactly what you want it will be easier to identify which nanny candidates are potential good matches and which ones aren’t.

If you’re working with an agency, it will be a lot easier for them to find ideal matches for you, or to let you know if what you’re looking for in a nanny is unrealistic so that you don’t waste your time.

And speaking of time…

  • Invest Time In Your Nanny Search

Hiring a nanny, or any employee for that matter, is a process that takes time.

Make sure that you actually have the time and make the time to invest in your nanny search, whether you’re doing it on your own or working with a nanny agency.

With an agency, you will need time to fill out a family questionnaire where you’ll share information about your family and your specific needs. You’ll need to speak with the agency directly to learn about the hiring process, including your responsibilities as an employer.

You’ll need to make time to go over nanny resumes, to interview potential candidates, and to give the agency feedback after each interview.

You may need to make time to have trial workdates with potential nannies and give feedback about your experience with each.

You may need to make time to re-evaluate your needs and start the process again.

Sometimes you get lucky and find your perfect nanny match quickly. Other times it takes a bit longer.

  • Prioritize Communication

⁠If you’re hiring a nanny on your own, be clear on your needs and expectations with potential nanny candidates.

If you’re working with a nanny agency, be honest about your family’s needs and expectations. Is your child anxious, or a picky eater? Do they have any special needs or require any type of special support? 

Remember: Nanny agencies work hard to make the best nanny-family matches based on the information they receive from both families and nannies. Share any questions or concerns you may have in a timely manner and trust the advice you receive from them. They absolutely want you to succeed in your search.

As an agency, our goal is to help you make the right childcare decisions for your family and if you choose to work with us to help you find your ideal nanny, we want the experience to be positive and successful.

To learn more about how we can help you in your nanny search, start here.

Categories
For Nannies

Overnight Childcare

Your nanny family has asked if you would be willing to stay overnight while they go away for a couple of days. You think about it and realize it is a great way to make some extra money quickly. But the family has a different idea about what they want to pay you. They don’t want to pay you when the kids are asleep. So what’s a fair rate for overnight childcare? I have a few options for you to choose from.

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For Nannies Newborn Care Specialist

When to Say “no” to a Parent’s Request

 

As a Newborn Care Specialist, you are hired to ensure the care and well-being of the newborn infant, and to make new parents’ transition into parenthood as easy as possible. In this role, you always want to respect the parents’ decisions regarding how they want to care for and raise their child, and to support their values, even if they differ from your own. With this in mind, NCS may feel like they have to say “yes” to every request that the parents make, however, that’s not the case. There are certain situations when it is appropriate, even essential, to say “no” to a parent’s request. We’ve listed some of these instances below. 

If a parent is asking for medical advice
You have been hired as a specialist and, as such, parents expect you to know everything there is to know about caring for a newborn. Parents will often ask NCS for their advice regarding medical procedures, including making decisions around infant vaccinations. You may have a wealth of knowledge and experience, but you are not a medical professional, so you must avoid giving parents medical advice, otherwise you are putting yourself at a liability risk. If a parent tries to engage you in such a conversation, it is perfectly okay to say “I am not a medical professional, so I can’t advise you one way or the other” and leave it at that.

If a parent is asking you to make a diagnosis
Once again, you are not a medical professional, so you aren’t able to diagnose conditions. Even if you’ve seen something similar before, and you’re 99% sure that’s what the infant is experiencing in this case, it’s always best to err on the side of caution and advise the parent to speak to a doctor, rather than making a diagnosis yourself. For instance, what looks like a common rash in one infant could actually be an indication of a serious allergic reaction in another. You may say something along the lines of “I’ve seen something like this before and it turned out to be __________, but you should speak to a doctor to be on the safe side”.

If you have been asked to prepare alternative/non-traditional formula for the infant
For infants that are bottle-fed, there are alternative/non-traditional formulas out there that may provide the infant with adequate nutrition. However, as the NCS, you should not be the one preparing those formulas for the infant. Factory-made formulas contain specific nutrients and have explicit instructions for how to properly prepare them, so it is okay for you to do the preparation in this case. Alternative/non-traditional formulas, on the other hand, do not come with the same nutritional information and instructions, and there is a risk that they will not be prepared properly and/or will not contain adequate nutrition for the growing infant. If parents choose to feed their infant alternative/non-traditional formulas, that is their decision and you must respect that decision, but you should not be the one preparing the formula, as it also puts you at a liability risk.

If you have been asked to dispense medication without the advice of a physician and a signed liability release form
Any medications you give to an infant must be prescribed by a physician, following the exact dosage and means of administration prescribed, and only after you and the parents have signed a liability release form. Unless these conditions are in place, you should never give an infant medication, as it may put the infant at a physical risk and you at a risk of liability.

If you are asked to check the infant’s temperature rectally without the parent’s supervision
It is a known fact that the most accurate way to read an infant’s temperature is with a rectal thermometer. However, you should never take the infant’s temperature this way unless you are being supervised by the parent, as it involves inserting something into the infant’s body, which can pose multiple risks. If the parent is not available to supervise, it is best to check the infant’s temperature by other means, such as by using a temporal artery thermometer on the forehead, or by placing the thermometer in the infant’s armpit to get a reading. In the case that the parent is present, it is reasonable to ask them to check the infant’s temperature rectally themselves.

If you are asked to trim the infant’s nails
It may seem less obvious than the other examples, but it is important to decline when a parent asks you to trim their infant’s fingernails or toenails. Trimming nails involves using a sharp object (nail clippers) near very soft, fragile skin and can accidentally result in cuts and/or infections. It is best to avoid any risk of liability in this case and let the parent trim the infant’s nails themself.

If you are asked to install a carseat
Unless you are a certified Child Passenger Safety Technician (CPST), you should not be the one installing the car seat in the parent’s vehicle or your own vehicle. Car seats must be installed in a very specific way in order to ensure that they are safe for the infant to ride in. If you are not trained in proper car seat installation, or being supervised by a CPST while doing so, you should never install a car seat on your own. Once again, it becomes a liability risk if anything were to happen to the infant while riding in an incorrectly installed car seat.